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Published by the 

UNITED STUDENT MOVEMENT 

Oakwood College 

Huntsville, Alabama 



JOE L. AVERY, Editor 

WILLIAM ALLEYNE, Associate Editor 

DAVID TAYLOR, Business Manager 

DR. F. W. HALE, Sponsor 



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He who would seek to grasp success 
Will find his goal sublime 
Borne hy the WHEELS OF PROGRESS 
Over the shiftless sands of time. 





Oakwood's ''WHEEL OF PROGRESS" is 
romposetl of spokes and axle, a perimeter, 
and a liuh. Tlie spokes are the administra- 
tion, the faeulty, the students, the academic 
program, the in(histries, and the social ac- 
tivities; the axle is the principle of service, 
hotli to God and man, around which all else 
revolves; the perimeter is the purpose in- 
stilled within the students which motivates 
them to prepare to he ^ood citizens and 
lahorers in this life on earth, and also in 
the everlastini>- life to come; and the hub 
is made up of the religious values which 
provide halance and equilibrium for the en- 
tire wheel, anil are the core of the progress 
of OakwoojI. 



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icauon 

^^The purest treasure mortal times afford is spotless reputation; that 
away men are but gilded loam or painted clay.^' — Shakespeare 

Good reputation justly earned is the most valuable asset any person 
can have. The combined efforts of Dr. and Mrs. O. B. Edwards, in properly 
seeking to guide those who come to Oakwood for training, have gained 
for them an invaluable reputation of being truly dedicated to the cause 
of God. We can readily see that the task of advising, instructing, and en- 
couraging students is not an easy one, and only such a consecrated team 
as Dr. and Mrs. Edwards could accomplish such a momentous assignment. 

Were we to eulogize each noble virtue and accomplishment of those 
to whom we dedicate this book, our tributes would be ceaseless and our 
present manuscript would be endless. 

The love and cheerfulness which have emanated from our Dean and 
Registrar as they have carried on their work among us, has given us the 
cheer in our hearts that makes it both a privilege and an honor to dedi- 
cate this sixtieth anniversary souvenir yearbook to such a distinctive 
couple. 

It is our sincere hope that the inspiring lives of Dr. and Mrs. Edwards 
will continue to be a part of Oakwood's "WHEEL OF PROGRESS." 




f-^reAidenVA 1/1/ h 



eddaa 



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'^^The greatest want of the world is the want of men — men who will 
not be bought or sold, men who in their inmost souls are true and honest, 
men who do not fear to call sin by its right name, men whose conscience 
is as true to duty as the needle to the pole, men who will stand for the 
right though the heavens fall.'''' 

Education p. 57:3 




Contentment is a wonderful and sought-after 
condition of mind. '^^Contentment with godliness is 
great gain." '^Therewith to he content" as a con- 
trolling philosophy can be soothing in situations 
impossible or unnecessary to change. 

But contentment has its limitations; satisfac- 
tion, its drawbacks. A great inventor said, ''Show 
me a completely satisfied man and I will show you 
a failure!" It takes a man with a dissatisfied mind 
to dare, to discover, and to design. Dissatisfied 
men build birds that race the sun, spanning con- 
tinents and oceans in mere hours. Dissatisfied 
people constantly reach out and up for something 
better, stronger, more beautiful, useful and en- 
during. Dissatisfaction etched skyscrapers against 
the evening sky, swung bridges above rivers, and 
grew electric eyes and brains. Discontent with the 
past has made our modern age the marvel of all 
time. 

Oakwood College salutes its 1955-56 students 
who were dissatisfied with ignorance and mean 
accomplishment; who were discontented with any- 
thing but the best; who strove for progress in 
culture, in mentality, in spiritual power, in cleanli- 
ness, honor, and attainment. May this Sixtieth An- 
niversary Acorn be to all readers both a record of 
the past and a challenge to the future! 

Garland J. Millet 



ADEL WARREN 

Business Manager and Treasurer 




JAMES MERIDETH 
ArrountanI 



10 



DR. O. B. EDWARDS 

Dean of the College 




ROBERTA C. EDWARDS 
Registrar 



11 



1896 DL 1906 




In the autumn of 189S, at the regular biannual session of the General 
Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, held in Battle Creek, Michigan, the 
unanimous decision was reached that there should he established an In- 
dustrial Training School in the South for the purpose of training Negro 
Seventh-day Adventist young people. Accordingly, a committee was selected 
to purchase suitable property, and they found a site about five miles from 
the city of Huntsville, Alabama, and purchased the 360 acre farm for the 
sum of $6,700. 

The school opened November 16, 1896, with twenty students. The 
original sixteen were Frank Brice, George Graham, Ella Grimes, Robert 
Hancock, Etta Littlejohn, Mary McBee, Nannie McNeal, Charles Morford, 
Thomas Murphy, Leia Peck, Daisy Pollard, Grant Royston, Samuel J. 
Thomas, Frances Worthington, and Harry Pollard. 

There were four buildings on the campus in 1896, among which was 
Old Mansion. The courses offered were grammar school and a special 
course in Religion. 

During the next ten years of steady progress, a new barn was built. 
Chapel Hall was erected for use as a boy's dormitory and classrooms, and 
Sunnyside, a teacher's cottage, came into being, so that by 1905 the 
property was valued at $15,437. 

These improvement served to draw new students so that by the fall 
of 1905 seventy-one were enrolled. 



! 



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The division of Education and 

Psychology sets in motion the i 

"WHEEL" of academic instruction.; 




The preparation of teachers and instructors to 
serve in the work of God as trainers of elementary 
and academy younjj people is the burden and pur- 
pose of the division of Education and Psychology. 
"Education does not mean teaching people to know 
what they do not know; it means teaching them to 
behave as they do not behave," and those who serve 
on the staff of this department seek to instill with- 
in those who are the teachers of Tomorrow such 
fundamentals and principles as will aid them in their 
work of inspiring children and youth to "behave as 
they do not behave." 



NATELKKA E. BURRELL 

Education 
Head of Department 




PHILLIP GIDDINGS 

Education 



RUTH STAFFORD, R.N. 
Nursing Education 




14 



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Methods of instruction as well as the psychology 
of the proper presentation of the subject material are 
taught, along with studies in Health and Health prin- 
ciples to safeguard their pupils, and Physical Educa- 
tion, so that they may assist the development of the 
body as well as the mind and the soul. 

Thus through the division of Education and Psy- 
chology the process of learning is directed and designed 
to promulgate better students and better citizens of this 
world and the world to come. 




GAINES R. PARTRIDGE 

Secondary Education 




VIOLET WILES 

Critic Teacher 



V. O. PLUMMER 

Education 




\ 



15 



i 




LABORATORY SCHOOL 




Inside The Laboratory School 



EL KAPPA BLANKA 

Pre-ISursing Students Club 

NAOMI DENNISON 
President 

RUTH STAFFORD 

Director of College Health Service 




16 





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FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA 
PHILLIPPA LATNEY 

President 




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VERNON TAYLOR 

Chaplain of the Medical Cadet Corps 

LIEUTENANT JOHN J. BEALE 
Officer in Command 

MEDICAL CADET CORPS in action. 




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17 




1906 OL 1916 

^^econci csLjeccicie 



The years from 1906 to 1916 were progressive ones for Oakwood. 
Professor W. J. Blake became the sixth principal in 1906, and he served 
in that capacity until 1911. 

On October 11, 1906, fire destroyed Chapel Hall. In that same year 
such industries as carpet-weaving, poultry raising, and shoe cobbling came 
into being. Also Oaklawn, a residence for principals, was built. In 1907, 
the first cement block structure, which was used as an administration build- 
ing, was constructed. Butler Hall replaced Chapel Hall in 1908, followed 
by the sanitarium building in 1909. 

Professor C. J. Boyd became the seventh principal in 1911. Under his 
leadership the school continued to progress. A two story orphanage was 
erected in 1912. In 1914, the Pines, a duplex apartment for faculty mem- 
bers was constructed. A print shop and Henderson Hall were built during 
the same year. The new laundry, garage, barn, silo, wagon house, and 
cannery were to improve the industrial development. 

From its humble beginning God prospered the "School of the Oaks," 
within whose walls have been trained some of the world's greatest men. 



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7 



As the student becomes 
proficient in oral 

and written English, 

our "WHEEL" of learning slowly 




The solution to many of the ills and prob- 
lems that exist in our turbulent world today 
can be found in the mutual understanding 
between man and man of each other's back- 
ground, culture, and- way of life, as well as 
the effective expression of one's own inner 
thoughts and feeling. The Division of Hu- 
manities is dedicated to this task of uplift- 
ing mankind through the elevating mediums 
of Art, English, Literature, Speech, Modern 
Languages, and Music. 



DR. E. B. DYKES 

English, 

Chairman of division of 

Humanities. 





20 




As we study these fellowmen, we also make 
provision for a better relationship between 
the nations of the world and us, bringing us 
nearer to long-sought goal of universal peace. 

In our pursual of the studies offered in 
the Division of Humanities, we will realize 
the fulfillment of our desires for self-im- 
provement, and we will experience a deeper 
appreciation for, and better understanding 
of humanity, elevating others as we ourselves 
have been elevated. 



THE AEOLIANS 

Under the direction of Mrs. J. M. 

Pierre-Louis. 




ALLEYNE DRAWS MARIE 
IN SECONDS!! 






ORGAN GUILD 

Kathryn Wilson, President- 



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umani 

^M MESSIAH SOLOISTS 

^^B Elbert Shepperd, Dorothy Dorsett, 

^^H Vivian Steele, Hannah Clarke, 

^^K James Edgecombe, and William 

^^m Scales 

I 




ALL GIRLS' CHORUS 

Phyllis Bryan, President 

Eva B. Dykes, Director 




23 Huntsville, Ala. 3S806 


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1916 Jhe 1926 



Oakwood continued to expand. In 1916 as a garage was erected just 
south of Old Mansion in addition to a barn, a silo, a wagon house, and 
a cannery. 

About this time representatives from the State Department of Edu- 
cation visited Oakwood for the second time. Ahhough they found the 
Oakwood facuhy conducting a good school, they recommended in their 
report that the industrial program be organized to correlate with the 
academy classes. 

Succeeding Professor Boyd as principal was Professor Beardsley who 
was appointed as the first president. Under his leadership the school ac- 
quired 12 concrete cisterns and a pump; a potato house in 1918; and 
two teachers' cottages in 1920 and 1923 respectively. 

The year 1922 was a success, for the student enrollment was en- 
larged; the faculty increased, and more books were added to the library, 
and the valuation of the property went up 1,000 percent. 

In the first half of 1926 a normal building and store were erected. 
In the midst of this construction program the dining hall was destroyed 
by fire. 

The General Conference voted a liberal appropriation of $15,000 
and a $32,000 building was erected. This housed not only the dining 
hall and kitchen, but a 40 room girl's dormitory which was named 
Irwin Hall. 






Oakwood endeavors to teach its students the 

importance of vocational skills, and it 

is in this division that the student 

receives training in the practi- 

-'f^^^tt'" cal pursuits that keep our 

"WHEEL" spinning 

toward its goal. 



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CHARLES E. GALLEY 

Head of Division of Apjdied 

Sciences 



JAMES E. MERroETH 
Accounting 



ARTHELIA ALEXANDER 

Instructor in Business 

Administration 



The Division of Applied Sciences includes the areas of Agriculture, 
Business Administration, Home Economics, and Secretarial Science. 

The Department of Agriculture offers courses designed to prepare 
both men and women for the practical affairs of life. The courses are out- 
lined to j5rovide a broad foundation in the natural sciences and to provide 
both versatility and culture for the Bible-trained worker in meeting all 
types of individuals, especially in rural areas. 

The aim of the Department of Business Administration is to provide 
a technical, liberal, and ethical education which will equip young men and 
^omen with the skills and knowledge necessary for business and economic 
competence. 

Courses in Home Economics are designed to accomplish the follow- 
ing objectives: to impart cultural education; to recognize the social and 



THOMASINE LONGWARE 

Instructor in Home Economics 






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cienceSx 



economic position of the home; to raise the ideals of homemaking; to 
provide scientific and technical knowledge; to prepare young women for 
the successful management of a home; and to furnish them with suffici- 
ent practice to fit them to become responsible homemakers, teachers of 
home economics, or workers in fields where this knowledge is needed. 

The Department of Secretarial Science seeks to provide a technical, 
liberal, and ethical education which will equip young men and women 
with the skills and knowledge necessary for them to enter offices as 
stenographers, secretaries, and general office workers. 

Courses in Library Science and Mechanical Arts are also offered in 
this division. 



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RUBY THOMPSON SEEKING GEMS OF KNOWLEDGE 




WHAT'S NEW IN THE NEWS? 
Warner Rice In The Library 



June and Donna at the Electrics 





HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 
Kathleen Graham, President , 
Thomasine Longware, Sponsor ■ 



Jackie and the Dictaphone 



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I 



1926 Jke 1936 



At the start of the fourth decade, Professor Joseph A. Tucker was 
serving as the second president of Oakwood Jr. College. 

Fire visited the campus a second time when it destroyed the dining 
hall in 1926 at a loss of $14,000. To take its place, Irwin Hall, named 
for one of the founders of the school, was constructed. This building be- 
came the girl's dormitory and* dining hall. 

Other improvements that came during the fourth decade were the 
students cottage built in 1928, the improvement of the dairy in the same 
year, and the erection of the circular reservoir in 1930. 

The increase in enrollment each year made a new building for 
classes necessary. To raise the funds needed to meet the part of the debt 
that the school was to reach, the Alabama Singers, a group consisting of 
male voices, toured a number of states. The young women did their part 
by selling pictorial copies of the Acorn in many cities. 

As the "WHEELS" of progress turned, evidences of God's pleasure 
were seen in the way that he blessed the school. 



Although in this division we mainly concern our- 
selves with theorems and abstractions, it is 
the inspiration of One who is the Per- 
sonification of all truth that gives 
us the basic solutions to all 
problems, thus keeping 
our "WHEEL" in 
repair. 




EMERSON COOPER 

Chairman of Division of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics 



ROBERT L. 



REYNOLDS 

Biology 





The main purpose of true education is to point man's mind to his 
Creator, and through the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
this aim is effectively realized. As the student is acquainted with the 
facets of animal and plant life, with the study of their structure and 
function, his eyes are opened to the wonders of created organisms; the 
composition and chemical changes of substances afford the student with 
an inexhaustable field of study; the relationship between objects and the 
necessary laws by which they may be correlated and compared bring 
about the realization of the magnitude of the Infinite as compared with 
the dwarfed insignificance of humanity; and the study of matter and 
motion further illustrates the marvels of God's created works. 

Thus the field of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics ful- 
fill the requirements of the purpose of this Division, broadening and 
developing the intellect as well as ennobling the spiritual powers with 
a deeper reverence for the Divine. 




HERBERT ALEXANDER 

liiology 



IRENE MERIDETH 
Mathematics 



32 




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fcience 
r via tnematii 



d 



OAKWOOD SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 



A Class in Physics 



ZODIACS 




^^SM^iS- 




H. E. FORD SCIENCE HALL 



ANATOMY CLASS LOOKS AT A SKELETON 




Science un 



I WatL 




HERBERT ALEXANDER, at work in the laboratory 



1936 Jke 1946 



Continual blessings and signs of prosperity descended upon Oak- 
wood during this period, giving evidence of the guiding hand of God in 
the development of this institution. Those associated with Oakwood at 
this time witnessed the following revolutions in our wheel of progress: 
the purchasing of a school bus and of a station wagon; the raising of 
funds for the Administration Building and its completion; the comple- 
tion of the construction of the Mechanical Arts Buildings; the raising of 
Oakwood from the status of a Junior College to a Senior College; the 
erection of the President's home; the building and remodeling of several 
laboratories; and a $100,000 appropriation received for the construction 
of the proposed girls' dormitory. The number of staff and faculty mem- 
bers nearly tripled, and the student enrollment showed a marked increase. 

Thus Oakwood continued to leave wheel marks on the sands of time, 
ever rolling onward atop the "Wheels of Progress." 






*** '^ 




'"■'"«!«»«SsSii^a*rtfc 



/ 



The success of our "WHEEL" depends greatly upon our 
understanding of others who also travel the road 
upon which we journey. Toleration and sym- 
pathy of the thoughts and experiences 
of fellow-travelers which come 
through the knowledge gained 
in this division will as- 
sure our "WHEEL" < 
of a smooth and 
pleasant 
journey. 






^ 


^^^^^ 


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DR. O. B. EDWARDS 


P* ■::wn '■ 


Chairman of Division 




M. J. HARVEY 




History 


^^^^^^^^^H 






INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 




WALTER GRANT, President 


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The study of man's relation to his physical background; the study 
of man's relation to the past; and the study of man's relation to his 
fellowman are the sum and substance of the courses of the Division of 
Social Sciences; History, Geography, and Sociology. 

As the student learns of the factors which arise out of geographic 
conditions, he can better know how to relate himself to his surroundings. 
Studying the past leads to a knowledge of how to relate oneself to the 
future; and the study of man from the social standpoint provides a better 
understanding and relationship between individuals. 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 




39 



1946 Jhe 1956 



At the beginning of this decade, as Oakwood stood facing the horizon 
of the future with fifty years of growth and progress inscribed upon the 
pages of its past, the hand of God was destined to write even more signifi- 
cant signs of development within its archives. 

The following accomplishments have been realized in this decade: 
Cunningham Hall, a dormitory housing one hundred forty-four college 
women and the college cafeteria; a laundry and dry cleaning plant; a 
broom factory housed in the Industrial Arts Building; a sewage disposal 
plant at a cost of seven hundred fifty-five thousand dollars; the W. H. 
Green Memorial Library; the H. E. Ford Science Hall; a central heating 
plant ; twelve homes for the faculty, and a new two hundred eighty thousand 
dollar dormitory, housing two hundred college and academy young men. 

At present a gymnasium-parvilen is under construction. Total enroll- 
ment now is over four hundred, a tremendous gain as compared with the 
original sixteen students. 

As we visualize our hopes for the future, we look forward to the 
continuous advancement of Oakwood, knowing that it is God's purpose 
and design that our "Wheel of Progress" draw nearer to its goal of Divine 
perfection. 



The ultimate realization of the goal to which 

our "WHEEL" is steadily moving will 

come about through the practical 

knowledge and application of 

the courses offered in 

this division. 





ELDER C. T. RICHARDS 

Chairman of Division 



Man's inability to grasp those things Infinite is partially responsible 
in a degree for his sinful state and the chaotic condition of the world. 
Thus the fields of Religion and Theology are essential tools in the edu- 
cating of young men and women. This division assumes the responsibility 
of training students in the importance of the Bible, of presenting the 
Life and Teachings of Christ as the perfect example of daily living, and 
of the preparation of ministers and workers to acquaint the world with 
the truths of salvation. The preparation and delivery of sermons and the 
pursual of studies in Biblical languages further enables those majoring 
in this division to do the work for which they have been chosen. 

As the student seeks to incorporate in his thinking these principles, 
he realizes more fully that he is attaining his quest for beneficial knowl- 
edge in the study of spiritual things. 



ELDER E. E. ROGERS 

Instructor of Biblical Languages 




ion 



EVANGELEERS' ASSOCIATION 




USHER BOARD 



MINISTERIAL SEMINAR OFFICERS 




:^A 


43 


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ion 



WEEK OF PRAYER SPEAKER 
IN CONFERENCE 



YOUNG LADIES IN PRAYER 





ELDER J. H, LAWRENCE 
WEEK OF PRAYER SPEAKER 



RARBI MURFELD 
CHAPEL SPEAKER 



ELDER E. E. CLEVELAND 
CONDUCTING MINISTERIAL WORKSHOP 




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! 




ELDER ROBERT L. WOODFORK 

Former church pastor 



DR. LEROY FROOM lectures on 
"Verities of 4dvent Faith" 



ELDER E. E. CLEVELAND 




Director of Ministerial 
W orkshop 



A7 



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Peterson Hall by Night 









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EXCELSIOR SOCIETY 

James Edgecombe, President 




VINCET QUA CE VINCET 

Frankie Fordham, President 



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■Mr 4^1 

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RUTH E. MOSBY, Dean of Women 



GAINES PARTRIDGE, Dean of Academy 
Men 





MYLAS W. MARTIN, JR., Dean of Men 



51 





GOING! 



GOING!! 




GONE!!! 
52 



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■^:UMmBM:'M<¥<::'-3. 







MR. VIOLIN PLUMMER 

Manager of College Store 




i 



MRS. SARAH RICHARDSON 

Director of College Cafeteria 




MR. LAWRENCE JACOBS 
Manager of Farm and Dairy 



54 




■ III lU 

■ •■■ ^ 

■ III W" ;■ 
Mil. ««i^ 




MR. GEORGE HARRIS 

Superintendent of Grounds 



MR. JOSEPH EMERSON 
Maintenance Manager 



MR. RALPH DAVIS 
Manager of Broom Factory 




55 





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MRS. JACOBS 

Assistant Dairy Superintendent 






DAIRY BUILDING 




LAUNDRY BUILDING 



^uk 



56 



CENTRAL HEATING PLANT 




INSIDE CENTRAL HEATING PLANT 



BROOM FACTORY 



57 





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Upper left hand corner: Upper right hand corner: 

CUSTODIAN DEPARTMENT BROOM FACTORY 



MORRIS WREN 

Firing the furnace 



Lower left hand corner: 
LAUNDRY 



Lower right hand corner: 
Francis and Cheatham 
on the farm 





Upper left hand corner: 
Allen Reid at the dairy 




Lower left hand corner: Lower right hand corner: 

Preparing the shirts in the Filing and checking in the 
Laundry Accountant's office 











"HIGH MIINDED" 

Joseph Anderson 



ASSORTING THE MAIL 
Mrs. Richards in the 
Posl Office 




m 






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I 



MEMORIES ARE MADE OF TfflS 




"IT'S A DEAL" 

Gerald Wells and 
Walter Grant 



"A WISHFUL THOUGHT" 
Donna Matthews 

60 




^ K. .-:w^0-:r^:.4-^. 




Clubs, Organizations, and Activities 

are important spokes in the 

"WHEEL OF PROGRESS" 




The Alabama University STRING QUARTET 
(Lyceum) 



MR. YEAGER, Cellist from Redstone Arsenal 



The Spreading Oak catches the eye of Miss 
Bryant 



Lower left corner: It has got to go in! 

The Annual Bonfire, under the direction of 
the United Student Movement. 




62 



THE VETERAN'S CLUB 
RICHARD BARRON, President 



Cathy looks on as Dr. Dykes 
presents gifts to Mrs. 
Woodfork. 



Scholarship check presented 
to President Millet by 
Mr. Reynolds and Mother 
Cunningham 

Lower Right Corner: THE 
OAKWOOD COLLEGE BOARD 

CONFERENCE OF ALABAMA COLLEGES 



63 






GAMMA SIGMA KAPPA 
Rliina Miller, President 



PAN AMERICAN CLUB 

Lemuel Sealy, President 



VIBRATONE ENSEMBLE 
Maurice Murphy, Director-Arranger 



64 



"MY TRUE STORY" 
(Vivian Cervantes) 



Joyce Bryant strolls 
with Ted and Cynthia 



Lower Right Corner: 
Vivian looks through 
the '55 Acorn. 



Vivian chats with 

Joyce and Elder Richards 



65 





ROBERT WILLIAMS 

President 



GAINES PARTRIDGE 

Sponsor 



Ok 



e 




Ulnited student r 1/ li 



ouemen 



t 



Left to Right: Robert Sloan, Religious Vice-President; Ruby Thompson, Secretary; 
Charles Joseph, Social Vice-President; Walton Whaley, Editor of Spreading Oak; 
Robert Williams, President; Gaines Partridge, Sponsor; Sybil Logan, Treasurer; 
Walter Grant, Assistant Treasurer; Edythe N. Sumpter, Parliamentarian; Gerald Wells, 
Sergeant-at-arms; Joe L. Avery, Editor of Acorn. 





WALTON WHALEY 
Editor 



Od 



Left to Right: James Harris, Dawn Reynolds, Robert Andrews, Gerald Wells, Oifford 
Hazell, El Nora Holland, Walton Whaley, Barbara Moseley, Walter Grant, Laureen 
Gunther. MYLAS W. MARTIN, Sponsor. 





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I DAVID L. TAYLOR, Business Manager 



[ROBERT TAYLOR, Copy Editor 



TOE L. AVERY, Editor 



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ELVA EVERSLEY, Assistant HWILLIAM ALLEYNE, Associate CHARLES CAMPBELL, Circulation\ 
Copy Editor ^ Editor Manager 




5RN 




SHIRLEY ROGERS, Typist 



EDDIE COLEMAN, Assistant 
Circulation Manager 



ED^ELESTER^rrEditorli 









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EDWARD MATTOX. Typist CHARLOTTE BRANTLEY, Roster Editor PEARL RAYMOND, Typist 




MISSES WILSON, DENT, STEELE, 

& MATTHEWS LISTEN TO MARIE 

KIBBLE, THE CHILDREN'S 

FRIEND. 



KENNETH LESTER 



Announcer 



CHAPEL HOUR TRIO 

Vivian Steele, Donna Matthews, and 
Claudia Dent 



72 




JAMES McLEAN 
Announcer 




"Well, it's the truth!" 

Pauline Watts and Harold Younger 






^s^*-. 





LANDMARK 



POP HARRIS AND HIS TEAM 







PRESIDENT AND MRS. MILLET 



73 



POP AND STIDHAM 




"LET ME EXPLAIN" 
James and Richard 



FUN AT THE FUNFAIR 




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ALL IS SAFE! 

Vernon Taylor, night watchman 



ROY HOLMAN 
Making the rounds 

74 



"YOU CAN'T GET 
ME NOW." 
Walter Grant 



n; 

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i 




JOSEPH RICHARDSON 
Chaplain 



EDYTHE N, SUMPTER 
Secretary 



GAYNELL TYLER 




LOIS YATES 



LONNIE WINSTON" 



<3C'* • 



'' Will graduate 
in the summer. 



76 



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HAROLD BREWER 
President 



JAMES HARRIS 
Vice-President 



*1t- 



PHILLIPPA LATNEY 

Assistant Secretary 




CARRIE BROWN 



i;..r-^ 




KATHLEEN GRAHAM 




WILLIAM GRANT NORMA FERGUSON 




FRANKIE LAWTON 



KENNETH LESTER 



'■V 



, 



SYBIL LOGAN 



NADINE McELHANEY 




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VIRGINIA MARTIN LA VAUNT MAUPIN 



MILDRED MOSLEY 



ESTER MEADOWS 



82 




SIMEON MINER, JR 






JAMES WALKER ROBERT WILLIAMS 

83 




JIT'^f 1^.> ^ 





Roiv One: Joe Avery; T^illian Baker; Helen Belt; Barbara Black; Carolyn Blacklock ; 
Terrell Bond. 

Row Two: Gwendolyn Bradley; Cecelia Braswell; Olivia Brummel; Clifton Buddy; Gloria 
Castleberry ; Mamie Cook. 



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omored 



Row Three: Benjamin Cummings; Leonard ('iimmings; Dorothy Dossetl; Jewellene 
Duckworth; Ella Eilum; Rosalie Evans. 

Row Four: Elva Eversley; Frankie Fordham; Winlon Forde; Dorrance Henderson; 
Martha Hardy; Elnora Holland. 





Rouj One: Betty Hubbard; Lawrem-e Jacob; Gloria Jones; Letha Jordan; Claudetle 
McNeil; Haille Salasse Mackey. 

Row Two: Geneva Mosby; Kathryn Newby; Barbara Peten; James Parker; Genevieve 
Price; Jewel Pringle. 



Annie Whitaker 




Row Three: Warner Rice; Bert Reid; Tbonias Simmons; Vivian Steele; Catherine 
Stewart; Beverly Stewart. 

Row Four: Louise Turner; Rosie Turner; Walton Whaley; Ethel Betty Williams; 
Morris Wren; Ella Wiley. 




Carl Alexander 
Beverly Anderson 
Joseph Anderson 
Dorthy Bailey 
Yvonne Baker 



Harold Bowley 
Jat'qiieline Boykin 
Charlotte Brantley 
Ann Brown 
John Carlos 



Eddie Coleman 
Willa Clark 
Melvin Cox 
Edward Daniels 
Osear Daniels 



Naomi Dennison 
Claudia Dent 
Leroy Dixon 
Leonard Draggon 
Jean Etliridge 



Mildred Farrior 
Mary Ellen Fondel 
Audrey Fordham 
Altamont Franeis 
Henry Flowers 



OIlie Carling 
Clevon Harris 
DeLois Harris 
Ernestine Harvin 
June Hicks 



Walvid M. Hinds 
Otis Goldsmith 
Barbara Moseley 




Christine Hooks 
Essie Hulcoinbe 
Altliea Lee 
Dorothy Lea 
Edye Lester 



Wilhe Lewis 
Alice Liiiiipkins 
Uelores Galloway 
Stanley Cellineaii 
Mattie Gipson 



Willie Glen 
Joyce Goldson 
Alberta Gordon 
(Christine Greene 
Mildred Green 



James Johnson 
Barbara Jones 
Doris Jones 
Willie McCIellan 
Hattie Kirk 



Lois McDonald 
Dorothy Mabry 
Donna Matthews 
Edward Maddoxs 
Phyllis Maycock 



Gloria Martin 
Jane Martin 
Mamie Martin 
Mary Martin 
Garland Millet 



Betty Monford 
Oscar Monford 
Leonard Mullens 





^<\ 




^jrpedk 



men 



87 





Claudette Nealy 
Fedora Norwood 
Evelyn Palmer 
Willie Parker 
Margret Pearson 



Geraldine Phillips 
Pattie Reaves 
Dawn Reynolds 
Cleveland Pitters 
Isabel Richardson 



Andrew Robinson 
Shirley Rogers 
Charley Sellers 
Sylvia Sellers 
Gayle Sheppard 



Ozell Simmons 
Robert Sparks 
James Spraggins 
Harry Swinton 
Gene N. Smith 



Robert Taylor 
Christien Thomas 
Clivin Victor 
Larry Ware 
Luther Washington 



Gerald Wells 
Richard Williams 
Sterling Williams 
Eloise Wilson 
Lola Wilson 



Barbara White 
Josephine White 
Joyce White 
Britta Yelder 
Cordelia Weathington 



68 




A snack after study period 



Deeply Engrossed 




Three heads are better than one 



The Sweet Shop 



Cutting the Orange 



You see, Maurice, it goes like this 



89 




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Out of life's vicissitudes come certain satisfactions that are as en- 
during as the ages. To those engaged in the "nicest work" as co-laborers 
with the Master Teacher in the education of ovir youth, these satisfactions 
may be experienced to no little degree. 

During this Sixtieth Anniversary Convocation of Oakwood College, the 
Academy Administration is deeply grateful to God for His superintendence 
in the affairs of our institution and for the consecrated men and women 
who in past years have made significant contributions toward the advance- 
ment of Oakwood College. Moreover, we should like to express sincere ap- 
preciation for friends, and loyal parents and patrons who have supported 
Oakwood College through years of prosperity and adversity. 

As we salute the graduates of 1956, we praise God for His benediction 
upon our humble endeavors to guide our youth according to the Divine 
Blueprint. As the Prophet of old, well may we exclaim, "Hitherto has the 
Lord helped us." 



92 



I 



*■' 





Shirley Murrell 

Row One: Willie Dean Battle; Sherman Cox; Nancy Griggs; Lavelle Holmes; Onnie 
Jackson. 

Raw Two: Eva Jenkins; Robert Knight; Rachel Logan; Charles McKinney; John McCoy. 



94 



s. 



entord 



Roiv One: June Patterson; Milton Pettis; Pauline Pearson; Thelma Ross; Chester Sims. 

Patricia Oliver 
Row Two: Emily Smith; Frances Stephens; Betty Taylor; Mildred Taylor; Binnie Woods. 










Row One: Rose Zell Allen; Dorothy L. Barnes; Henry D. Brewer; Adger Butler; Harry 
Cartwright; Dorothy Cooper; Venita Cooper; John Dennison. 

Rttw Two: Nathanael Dennison; Alice Duvall; Henry Fordham; Charles Herring; Marie 
A. Hoyle; Shirley Jackson; Benny Knight; Wilson Lyles. 



J' 



untopd 



Row Three: Marion Martin; Claude McKnight; Alberta Barnett; Jacob Miller; Iretha 
Morgan; Clifton Mouzon; Loretta Royster; La Fonde Simms. 

Row Four: Marjorie Smith; Morma Stephens; Bernice Sumpier; Otis Taylor; Shirley 
Taylor; Dollie Thomas; Olga Whitman. 





Robert Jones 

Row One: Lorain Battle; Charles Benton; James Brown; Gail Cathcart; Wanda Carter; 
Norma Dennis. 

Roosevelt Jones 

Roiv Two: Cynthia Dent; Jackie Hall; Raymond Hodnett; Clara Ortjz; Beverly 
Humphrey; Albert Johnson. 

Row Three: Cordon Lewis; Mary McMickens ; Ida Morgan; G. George Morgan; Vernol 
Murray; Delores Perkins. 

Row Four: John Prater; Olean Roberson; Lonnie Roberson; Arlene Seard; Elbert 
Seard; Donna Lee White. 

Jean King 









James Johnson 

Row One: Willie Abell; Masters Bennett; Ra Ama Bennett; Emma Burage; Grace 
Custard; Rosetta Furman. 

Rom; Two: Conway Haynes; Gwyndell Holloway; Harold Jacobs; Albert Johnson, Jr.; 
Barbara Johnson. 

Row Three: Sylvan Marsh; Gloria McKenzie; Alverda Miller; Patricia Mouzon; Charles 
Pressy; Sandra Pruitt. 

Roto Four: Allen Robertson; Alverine Scott; Ronald Stephens; Viole L. Valentine; 
Johnny Wright; Paulette Young. 




men 



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1 







THE ACORNETTES BASKETBALL TEAM 




THE TRACK TEAM 




THE WEIGHT-LIFTING CLUB 



99 






ACORN STAFF: 

Nathanael Dennison, Editor-in-Chief (center) 
Cluade McKnight, Circulation Manager (left) 
Bennie Knight, Business Manager (right) 

BYKATO CLUB: 

Marion Martin, President 

ACADEMY HOME ECONOMICS CLUB: 

Kathleen Graham, Student Teacher 

ACADEMY USHER BOARD: 
John Dennison, President 

METROPOLIERS: 

John Dennison, Director 







i^iubi 




100 




SPREADING OAK STAFF: 
Sherman Cox, Editor-in-Chief 
Florence Winslow, Sponsor 

GAMMA ALPHA GAMMA CLUB: 
Rachel Logan, President 

ACADEMY CHOIR— "Magdregalians" 
Mrs. Booth, Director 

CHEERING SQUAD 

ACADEMY STUDENT ASSOCIATION: 
Brue Herring, President 




101 



a 



raanlza ilond 





^(f W ^ ® 






Life of the Dorms 

FRANCES STEPHENS 

MARION MARTIN 




Best Instrumentalists 

EVA JENKINS 
LEONARD MULLINS 



WL 



Best Athletes 

ROSE ZELL ALLEN 

MILTON PETTIS 




Tallest and Shortest 

JOHN PRATTER and MARIE 

HOYLE, MASTERS BENNETT and 

ESSIE FORDE. 



WL 




King and Queen and Attendants 
Sealed: LORETTA ROYSTER and CHESTER SIMS. 
Standing: MARSHALL SEARD, DELORES PERKINS, 
PATRICIA WHITMAN and ROBERT KNIGHT. 



Best Dressed 
BENNIE KNIGHT 




Most Studious 
JOHN DENNISON 
IRETHA MORGAN 



102 





Seard brothers study with cousin 



"Hunt" and "Peck" 



.^.Art S^tudu in the <=>Di 



^ 



onn 




Reflection of Knowledge 



What a mixture. (Girls and Books) 



Two Johns study 





THE BYKOTA CLUB PARTY 



Upper right hand corner: 

THE BYKOTA CLUB'S SPONSOR and GUEST, 

and PRESIDENT. 



Study period in girl's Dormitory 



Leader: John Dennison composing a song for the 
Metropoliers. 




Mildred Taylor and Marie Hoyle busy in the Ac- 
counting Office. 





"TfUdUtud^ ;4%e "^ecutut^ 



THEIR WAY INTO THE MESSAGE THROUGH THE 



SOUTHERN UNION BIBLE SCHOOL LESSONS 



■;: 




Bible School Office Building and Workers 

Students Enrolled 530,962 

Lessons Mailed . . . . . . 8,379,274 

Baptisms 3,493 

Sabbath Interests still on file . . . . 11,760 

There are 27,000,000 souls in our union. Only 2Jo have been enrolled. 
Help us to enroll at least 10% quickly. 

SOUTHERN UNION CONFERENCE 

DECATUR. GEORGIA 
106 



BEST WISHES 



FROM 



OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 

ALABAMA CHEMICAL COMPANY 

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 



For over 44 years we 

have known Oakwood. We 

Congratulate Her Progress 

during those years. 

J. E. SANDLIN HARDWARE CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Phone JE. 4-0614 

Hunfsville, Alabama 



May you have many more 
successful Anniversaries 

MASON FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

Huntsvilie, Alabama 

We appreciate your trade 



107 



VANCE MORRIS MOTOR CO. 

Wrecker Service 

224 Norfh Jefferson Street 

Day Phone JE. 2-3661 

Night Phone JE. 4-9753 


Congratulations 

HUNTSVILLE'S 

NEW CAR DEALERS 

ASSOCIATION 


Compliments 
of 

HUNTSVILLE GLASS CO. 

221 Washington Street 
Huntsvifle, Alabama 


T. T. TERRY'S 

South Side Square 

Ira M. Terry Jas. H. Terry 
Owners 


FOWLER'S 

Department Store 

"Yours for Service" 
Huntsville, Alabama 


Compliments 
of 

DOUBLE COLA 

Huntsville, Alabama 


Compliments 
of 

HUNTSVILLE'S HOTEL 
ASSOCIATION 


Compliments 
of 

DILWORTH LUMBER CO. 

404 North Church Street JE. 4-7374 
Huntsville, Alabama 



108 



"■ 

Best Wishes 
from 

IDEAL BAKERY 


SUCCESS 

BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

116 So. Jefferson JE. 4-1624 
Established 1923 


Compliments 

MADISON PIANO 
COMPANY 

104 So. Jefferson JE. 6-2752 


Compliments 

AUTO ELECTRIC 

SERVICE COMPANY 

Huntsville, Alabama 


Anniversary Greetings 

MAPLES SHEET 

METAL COMPANY 


SUCCESS! 

BOOTH'S STUDIO 

"Our Acorn Photographer" 

JE. 4-9135 Church Street 
Huntsville, Alabama 


You Will 

Always 

Be Clad You Shopped 

AT 

DUNNAVANT'S 

Huntsville's Quality Family Store 


L MILLER AND SON 

Scrap Metal Dealer 

New Steel - Welding Rods and 
Equipment 

201-221 8th Street, N.W. 
Phone JE. 6-1521 Huntsville, Alabama 



109 



H. C BLAKE 


COMPANY 


Heating 


Iron Fireman Stokers 


Plumbing Heating 


Electrical Wiring 


No. 3 Soufh Side Square JE. 4-0781 


HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 


Compliments 
of 


MEADOW-GOLD DAIRIES 


Southwest Region Conference 


Manufacturers of 


of 


Meadow Cold Ice Cream 


Seventh Day Adventists 


Milk -Butter and Cottage 


Headquarters 


Cheese 


Dallas, Texas 


601 Wesf Clinton Sfrreef 


H. R. Murphy, President- 


Hunfsville, Alabama 


A. R. Caruthers, Secrefary-Treasurer 





no 




LAKE REGION CONFERENCE 

619 Woodland Park 
CHICAGO 16, ILLINOIS 

"A field of great opportunity for Christian service" 
Territory: States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin 

H. W. KIBBLE F. N. CROWE 

President Secretary-Treasurer 



MADISON FOODS 

Devoted to the Protection of your Health 

Division of Nashville Agricultural Normal Institute 
Madison College, Tennessee 

The Finest Foods 

By 

MADISON 

Zoy-Koff Zoyburger Meatless Steaklets Not-Meat 

Vigovost Yum Mock Chicken Cheye-0-Soy 

Meatless Nu-Steak Madison Burger Sandwich Loaf 

Remember Madison foods belong where fine things are Cherished 



111 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

SOUTH CENTRAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

SEVENTH -DAY ADVENTIST 

AND 

SOUTH CENTRAL 

BOOK AND BIBLE HOUSE 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
W. W. FORDHAM, President L. E. FORD, Secretary-Treasurer 



112 



Compliments 
of 

CLIFF AND HOLMBERG 


HAROLD'S 

"Everything for the College Girl" 
7 North Side Square JE. 6-2602 


MONROE'S 

Huntsville's Leading Printers 
Since 1913 


BUSANN'S SHOES 

"Correct fittings always 
Assured." 

Corner, Twickenham Hotel Building 


Greetings 

BUFORD MOTOR COMPANY 

Huntsville 


V WFIII J (yC*J^fe^^^^^^ /w«$Mi«ToiA 


Compliments 

PRUin'S RADIATOR SERVICE 

Huntsville, Alabama 


Madison County 
Exchange, Inc. 

404 N. Jefferson St. JE. 2-3141 

"The farmers themselves" 
Huntsville, Alabama 


Compliments 
of 

GILES SEED COMPANY 

Huntsville 


Compliments 
of 

SHERMAN WILLIAMS PAINT 
COMPANY 

JE. 2-2611 112 N. Jefferson 



113 



COMPLIMENTS 

ALLEGHENY CONFERENCE 

OF 
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 

P.O. Box 730 Pottstown, Pennsylvania 

W. L. CHEATHAM, President 
M. S, BANFIELD, Treasurer 

PINE FORGE INSTITUTE 

Pine Forge, Pennsylvania 
Professor E. I. WATSON, Principal 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 



REVIEW AND HERALD PUBLISHING 
ASSOCIATION 

WASHINGTON 12, D. C. 



114 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

NORTH EASTERN CONFERENCE 

OF 

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 
H. D. SINGLETON, Presidenf V. L. ROBERTS, Secretary-Treasurer 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CENTRAL UNION CONFERENCE 
OF SEVENTH -DAY ADVENTIST 

Colorado - Kansas - Missouri - Nebraska 
Wyoming 

The Central Union Conference pays its respects to the Acorn, repre- 
senting an institution devoted to the training of consecrated workers for 
the giving of "the gospel to the world in this generation." 

May your aims be successful and your attainments reached in its 
sacred challenge. 



115 



THE 
HUTCHENS CO. 

Established 1886 

Wholesale and Retail 

Hardware - Householdware 

Plumbing & Electrical Supplies 

Contracting 

Visit Our Gift Shop 
Huntsville, Alabama 


Compliments 
of 

CENTRAL STATES 

CONFERENCE 

OF 

S. D. A. 

F. L. Bland - President 
H. T. Saulter - Secretary-Treasurer 


ACORN STAFF 

F. W. Hale, Jr., Sponsor 

Joe L. Avery, Editor 

William Alleyne, Assistant Editor 

Edyte Lester, Art Editor 

David Taylor, Business Manager 

Charles Campbell, Circulation Manager 

Robert Taylor, Copy 

Charlotte Brantley, Roster Editor 

Eddie Coleman, Assistant Circulation 
Manager 

Shirley Rogers, Typist 

Edward Maddox, Typist 

Pearl Raymond, Typist 

Nathaniel Dennison, Academy Editor 


UNIVERSAL PHOTO SHOP 

Cameras Supplies 
Projectors 

115 E. Clinton JE. 2-8851 


WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATION STORE 

"Everything for the Automobile" 
"Household Appliances" 

112-114 Meridian Street 
R. C. Darden, Owner-Manager 



116 



THE COLLEGE STORE 



APPLIANCES 

BOOKS 

CLOTHING 

FOODS 

GIFTS 

HEALTH PRODUCTS 

NOVELTIES 

PHONOGRAPHS 

RADIOS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

SKATES 

STATIONERY 



Your Doorway 



VIOLIN PLUMMER 
Manager 




To Shopping 
Convenience 



GENE SMITH 
Assistant Manager 



117 





• 
COMPLIMENTS 




OF 


THE 


OAKWOOD COLLEGE 




LAUNDRY 




MARILE EMERSON, 

Superintendent 




- ^ 






118 



7710 Carroll Avenue 
Washington 12, D. C. 




D. A. Ochs, President 

C. H. Kelly Secretary -Treasurer 



Columbia Union Conference Office 

Our Sincere Congratulations 



on 



The Occasion of Your 60th Anniversary 

COLUMBIA UNION CONFERENCE OF 
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS 




Officers and departmental secretaries. 



Office secretaries. 



Greetings from 

THE OAKWOOD CHAPEL 
HOUR STAFF 

-WFUN RADIO PERSONNEL - 

KENNETH LESTER - Narrator 
JAMES McLEAN - Narrator 
MARIE KIBBLER - The Children's Friend 
STANLEY CELLINEAU - Soloist 
KATHRYN WILSON - Organist 
CLAUDIA DENT - The 

NAOMI DENNISON - Chapeliers 
DONNA MATTHEWS - 
JAMES EDGECOMBE - The Collegiate 
EDWARD MATTOX - Quartet 

WILLIAM SCALES- (Cathedral Record- 
ELBERT SHEPPHARD - ing Artists) 
ELDER C. T. RICHARDS - Continuity 
DR. F. W. HALE - Continuity Director 



Compliments 
of 

THE UNITED STUDENT 
MOVEMENT 

Robert Williams, President 

Ruby Thompson, Secretary 

Professor G. R. Partridge, Jr., Sponsor 



119 




Pleasant Recovery! 

Friendly service makes the road 
to recovery seem shorter, less 
tedious, at modern Riverside 
Sanitarium & Hospital. Here the 
emphasis is on you, your com- 
fort, your welfare as a devoted, 
skilled staff helps you shed 
worries while your body mends. 
Write today for full particulars 
on Riverside's more pleasant way 
of returning you to good health. 



Ultra-Modern facilities for diagnosis 
and treatment rank Riverside as a lead- 
ing medical institution. 

Finest Obstetrical care as well as surgi- 
cal, medical, pediatric and sanitarium 
services assure complete attention. 





RIVERSIDE 

Sanitarium & Hospital 

800 Young's Lane - Nashville 7, Tenn. 



120 




white earning 

your scholarship 

this stBwnwner 



Sell 



and 



GOLDEN 
TREASURY 
OF BIBLE 
STORIES 

Message 



I here is not a more profitable way to spend 
the summer months than bringing the message 
of salvation to others while financing your own 
Christian education. 

You will not only experience the soul-satisfying 
thrill of walking with God from door to door, but you 
will also learn invaluable lessons on 
satisfactory personal relationships without which 
no education is complete. 
Decide now— right now— to join hundreds of others this summer who will roll up 
high sales records with this excellent combination designed to appeal 
to the whole family-GOLDEN TREASURY OF BIBLE STORIES and MESSAGE MAGAZINE 

See your publishing secretary today. 





OUTHERN PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION, BOX 59, NASHVILLE 2, TENN. 



12T 



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INTER-COLLEGIATE PRESS 

Publishers - Cover Manutacturers Book Binders 
FACTORY HOME OfflCE 

Kansas City 



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